Elephant-Gorongosa-Mozambique

Highlights of Mozambique in two weeks

O

ften overshadowed by its neighbours to the north and south, Tanzania and South Africa, Mozambique is a hidden gem still relatively untouched by large-scale tourism.

It was partly for this reason that Alex and I chose to get married on Mozambique’s white-sand coastline in the north; it’s picturesque, private and an ocean-lover’s paradise. Over several trips, we took the opportunity to explore the length and breadth of the country’s diverse and beautiful landscape.

 

I have compiled a list of our favourite spots to see Mozambique’s wildlife, explore cities and bush, meet locals, relax and have some wonderful family (or child-free!) adventures. I recommend you drive as much as possible; we were able to see so much more, appreciate and understand the culture that much better, and come away with surprise experiences and stories that we otherwise wouldn’t have had.

This itinerary is very possible to do in two weeks so as to accommodate school holidays or work commitments and will give you a wonderful taste of all that Mozambique has to offer, leaving you desperate to return for more!


Maputo

Mozambique’s capital is a bustling city full of people, traffic and noise, but it is also one of Africa’s most attractive capitals. Set on the shores of the Indian Ocean, Mediterranean-style buildings house restaurants, cafes, bars and guesthouses on wide, tree-lined streets.  

The warnings you may hear of Maputo being unsafe are seemingly unfounded; everyone we met was friendly and we felt safe walking around at night. Of course, feelings of safety are anecdotal and depend entirely on personal experience, but I have no reservations about family travel here.

I highly recommend the craft market if you enjoy browsing beautiful artwork, sculpture and furniture. Be prepared to haggle but remember it’s a good rule of thumb to aim to pay what you think an item is worth, not the lowest possible.


Limpopo National Park

Parque Nacional Do Limpopo sits adjacent to Kruger National Park on the southern border with South Africa, and is a ‘big-five’ area.

I recommend staying at Machampane Wilderness Camp, located a five to six hour drive from Maputo. Set in the heart of the African bush, it’s an opportunity to enjoy being surrounded by nature.

The tented en suite rooms have basic facilities (running water but no electricity, and don’t be surprised if you share the room with ants and spiders) and rustic handmade furniture, including a comfortable bed for a good night’s rest. They’re certainly far more luxurious than any other tent I’ve slept in! The rooms overlook the Machampane river, which is home to hippos and a regular drinking source for other big game.

 

Our ranger was incredibly knowledgeable about both flora and fauna. During our dawn and dusk hikes through the bush, we were taught to identify clues while tracking game, which plants to avoid, and which plants would offer a lifeline if stuck out here unexpectedly.

After dinner, you can sit around a campfire with staff and other guests. The warming crackle of the fire, the blanket of stars overhead and the trickle of the running river, only briefly interrupted by the sound of elephants in the distance, all make for a relaxed evening affair after the excitement of the day’s adventures in the bush.


Gorongosa National Park

Located three hours from Beira airport, I urge you to make the journey to Gorongosa National Park for an incredible safari experience.

 

We had close encounters with lions and several huge herds of elephants, as well as many species of antelope. The resident warthogs, baboons and vervet monkeys are very curious and come right up to the secluded and tastefully furnished bedrooms.

The elephants of Gorongosa are survivors of the Mozambique civil war, a period that saw the numbers drop from over 2000 to approximately 500 elephants. The emotional scars remain, as is common with elephants recovering from severe poaching.

They are known to be anxious around humans and can charge if they feel threatened. Exposure to safe encounters with humans is reducing this anxiety but the guides are very knowledgeable about elephant behaviour so will keep you a safe distance and ensure you retreat if necessary.

The park itself is beautiful and offers a wide variety of landscapes and ecosystems. Where Limpopo is quite flat, Gorongosa has mountains, forests and vast open plains.

Take a trip to the Vinho community, which includes a boat ride and walk through the village. You will meet the locals and have an opportunity to learn more about their daily life, customs and traditions.

When we visited, we struck up a conversation (translated by our guide) with a gentleman and his ten children. He was busy rebuilding one of his two mud houses for one of his wives. His other wife lived directly opposite in the second mud house, just a few steps away, and he split his time between the two houses and his two families. A very alien concept to us, a British family, but not uncommon here.

One of the sons showed us round his mother’s house. Stooping to enter and with little space to move inside, the first word that came to mind was ‘claustrophobic’, particularly for a family of 8. He pointed out the living quarters and, at the side, the sleeping area. The floor was bare and there was nothing obvious to distinguish these zones.

A humbling experience and a pleasure to meet these children, who happily play with their siblings and are overjoyed to simply be able to attend school.


Vilankulos and the Bazaruto Archipelago

Vilankulos is the gateway to the Bazaruto Archipelago. Although many people pass through, Vilankulos is worth a visit in its own right and we found it to be less touristy than some of the other popular beach towns.

 

I can recommend the Baobab Beach Backpackers hostel, which is located a ten minute drive from the airport and provides cheerful accommodation right on the beach in a relaxed, fun setting and at a very reasonable price. The town centre with its shops, cafes and colourful markets is an easy walk or tuk-tuk ride away.

 

If you’re after idyllic but fairly extravagant luxury, Bazaruto and Benguerra Islands are the place to be. Relax and eat your meals sitting on the white sand beaches; explore the waters by kayak or on a sunset dhow cruise; ride horses across the island and take a walk up the towering sand dunes, meeting resident flamingos on the way.

The helicopter ride between Vilankulos airport and the archipelago offers fantastic views and is highly recommended, but be warned that it doubles the cost of a one night stay!


Nacala

Located 4 hours drive or a charter flight from Nampula airport, Nuarro Lodge in Nacala is wonderfully isolated and combines ecotourism with the everyday luxuries of running water, electricity and WiFi. Built with sustainable, locally-sourced materials by the local community, they have an ethos of both environmentally and socially responsible tourism.

Located on Nanatha bay, right on a coral reef, this is a beautiful location for watersports and relaxation. The lodge offers a ranging of diving packages but the snorkelling is also formidable. Bring waterproof shoes for children so they can walk on the rocks. We really enjoyed the company of the management team and staff from the local village.


Mozambique Island

Ilha de Moçambique has several colonial buildings and attractions of interest. The call to prayer can be heard across the island from the mosque; just one of a number of examples where the coming together of two distinct cultures can be observed in the island’s architecture. Take a walk around the island and stop at local markets and shops.


Pemba and the Quirimbas Archipelago

The Quirimbas National Park offers every ocean adventure you could wish for: scuba diving, snorkelling, whale watching, fishing, sailing on a traditional handmade dhow, and boat trips to neighbouring islands.

 

I highly recommend Guludo Beach Lodge, a sustainable establishment that has been built with the environment and local community in mind. There’s no electricity or running water, and yet they still achieve luxury. This is where Alex and I had our wedding.

Discover the ocean, play archery and volleyball on the beach, learn the crafts of pottery and palm leaf weaving, and search for wildlife from the lookout. A visit to Guludo village is an opportunity to experience rural life and shop for fabric (Guludo’s tailor is incredibly talented and is happy to make clothes, bags and many other items from your chosen fabric). You could even contribute to a community project run by Nema, Guludo’s partner charity.


Africa is my favourite continent (of the five I have been to) and I feel drawn to keep going back, particularly to sub-Saharan Africa. Africa is certainly where my heart is!

Of course, every country is different, with its own customs, culture and societal norms, but three things come to mind when I think of the African continent: the bold, bright colours of the landscape that are mirrored in clothes and artwork, and enable the collective African personality to shine; the music, led by the beat of a drum, that compels even the most rhythmically challenged to get up and dance; and the broad smiles of the people you’ll meet, so welcoming and proud that they are able to show you the country they love. Certainly, we experienced all this and more in Mozambique.

2-weeks-in-Mozambique 2-weeks-in-Mozambique

4 Responses

Leave a Comment