A starry night at Guludo Beach Lodge, Mozambique

8 Destinations for the eco-conscious traveller

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re you looking for the ideal ecotourism destination? Somewhere committed to both environmental and social sustainability? Look no further! I’ve asked some of the top travel bloggers out there for their input on their favourite eco locations.


1

Kahang Organic Rice Eco Farm, Malaysia

 

Kahang-Organic-Rice-Eco-Farm-Malaysia Kahang-Organic-Rice-Eco-Farm-Malaysia

My family and I stayed at a rice farm in Malaysia recently, which was a beautiful place to relax in and an excellent eco-friendly accommodator to support. KOREF (Kahang Organic Rice Eco Farm) is a “leisure farm”, so it is not a place to work hard on farm chores, but rather learn a bit about farm life while having some fun. There are many activities visitors can choose from, including rice planting or harvesting, bamboo rafting, kayaking, a water obstacle course and jungle trekking. KOREF also has a sustainable fish farm, which guests can learn more about and even try to catch and release some fish.

Another activity was wonderful for cultural understanding. Visitors can choose to visit an Orang Asli village in the nearby rainforest, with an excellent guide who works closely with KOREF staff. We did meet the beautiful people there, and were very grateful for the experience.

KOREF is and organic farm at heart, and they use their own food as well as locally-sourced produce for the delicious meals provided to guests. KOREF also provides free filtered water from a fountain to everyone, and separates their rubbish for recycling. Unfortunately, this is uncommon from what we have seen in Malaysia.

We loved staying there and getting a taste of farm life in such a beautiful setting. It is a great destination for kids with all of the activities on offer, and the fun and stress-free ways they help people learn about farming. School groups from cities in Malaysia and Singapore arrive often to get a very different view of life!

Submitted by Emma Walmsley from Small Footprints, Big Adventures


2

 Las Terrazas, Cuba

 

Looking at Las Terrazas, Cuba, through the trees Looking at Las Terrazas, Cuba, through the trees

Initiated in the late 1960s as an ecotourism project, Las Terrazas is a UNESCO biosphere reserve about an hour west of Havana, in the Cuban countryside. It is a lush complex with dense foliage, tropical swimming holes, waterfalls and 18th century abandoned coffee plantations. Although you can see Las Terrazas in a day, this is a place that merits more time to truly experience it.

The town has something for everyone. Bird lovers will appreciate that Las Terrazas is home to almost half of Cuba’s endemic birds. The nearby Sosoa Botanical Gardens maintain a collection of rare orchids. There is a selection of trails led by students at the biosphere that take you through the local flora.  For the more adventurous, there is also a thrilling canopy tour which whizzes you over six lines extending over lakes, a forest and much more.

The artists in the colony live in town and their workshops are in their homes.  People are welcome to enter their homes and watch them work, browse their creations and possibly purchase some very nice and authentic pieces of art.  There is a little coffee shop in the area, Café de Maria, that bills itself as having the world’s best coffee. With advertising like that and at about .40 cents a cup, you have to try it.

The local Hotel Moka sits on a hill-top with a beautiful view overlooking the forest and the small village. In keeping with the eco-friendly theme of the location, the hotel has a tree growing in the middle of the lobby and serves only locally grown produce. The two must-try restaurants in town are vegetarian and delicious!

Submitted by Talek Nantes from Travels with Talek


3

 Tasmania

 

Tasmania hills and forest green Tasmania hills and forest green

Tasmania is a nature lover’s paradise. This small island, about the size of Ireland or West Virginia, is home to vast wilderness and completely unique ecosystems compared to the rest of Australia, complete with endemic animal species and subspecies not found on the mainland. So precious are Tasmania’s varied landscapes — from verdant rainforests to mountains to white-sand beaches — that around 20% of its landmass is World Heritage listed. And that’s without mentioning its quaint country towns, impressive local food scene, and wealth of convict-era sites and ruins testifying to a rich, if often dark, colonial history.

Unsurprisingly, Tasmanians are increasingly embracing sustainable tourism. But few places boast the eco-friendly credentials of a certain private nature reserve in Tasmania’s northwest by the name of Mountain Valley. Situated on some 61 hectares, this reserve is run by a husband-and-wife team with a passion for wildlife and conservation. To protect the vulnerable habitats and fauna on site, they’ve signed schemes agreeing that their property can never be logged or degraded. It’s also a release area for rehabilitated wildlife — and a one-of-a-kind, no-frills accommodation option, complete with 1970s-style log cabins.

With old growth forests, caves and even a glowworm grotto, Mountain Valley is a haven for wildlife. Wild echidnas, wombats, platypi, possums, Tasmanian native hens, pademelons, spotted tail quolls and the sadly endangered Tasmanian devils all call this place home. Lucky guests may even just find a few local critters on their very doorstep.

Submitted by Sarah Trevor from World Unlost


4

 Iceland

 

Rocky cliffs and ocean waves on the coast of Iceland Rocky cliffs and ocean waves on the coast of Iceland

Iceland is a wonderful eco-friendly destination and one of the world leaders in sustainability.  The nature of Iceland is so pristine and clean that it is almost impossible to wrap your head around how pure things are there.  While tourism is on a major rise there, the country is doing everything it can to cater to this tourism boom in a sustainable and ethical manner.  Nearly 100% of Iceland’s electricity comes from renewable energy, which is remarkable and a model that every country should aspire to follow and achieve.  Another thing I loved about Iceland, Reykjavik in particular, is how easy it was to find vegetarian and vegan options.  You don’t necessarily associate Iceland as being meat-free, but the options are there in masses.  You can rent a bike with ease in Reykjavik, too.  I think Iceland is a country that really sets the benchmark for clean energy and spectacular nature.

Submitted by Megan Starr from meganstarr.com


5

Eco Hostel Gili Meno, Indonesia

 

Gili_Meno_Eco_Hostel Gili_Meno_Eco_Hostel

In Indonesia, just a boat ride away from Bali, in the paradise island that is Gili Meno, you can find the Eco Hostel Gili Meno.

Gili Meno is a small island that can be walked in 1 hour and the Eco Hostel is conveniently located by the seaside in front of Turtle Point, where you can snorkel with turtles.

The Eco Hostel is an incredible place that is all built around the logic of sustainability and eco-tourism.

You can sleep in bungalows by the beach on just a simple mattress or in the fantastic Treehouse, while the concept of dorm-room is taken to another level by letting you sleep in hammocks that can be zipped from the inside to avoid mosquitos nuisance in the night.

The toilets are composite toilets and the showers are half salt water and half spring water. Everything is built out of wood.

There is a bonfire area by the beach and in the morning people wake up before sunrise to enjoy the majestic natural show in the communal area.

It is a place that you will never want to leave, once you get used to the slow pace of life and to the chess challenges with the young Indonesian boys working in the hostel.

Submitted by Sara and Ale from Foodmadics


6

 Wisconsin, USA

 

Kayaking at the Apostle_Islands_Sea_Caves Kayaking at the Apostle_Islands_Sea_Caves

Wisconsin offers unique travel destinations and was home to environmental legends, John Muir, Gaylord Nelson, and Aldo Leopold. Travel Green Wisconsin certification recognizes businesses that have made a commitment to reduce their environmental impact.  Here are just a few.

  1. Wilderness On the Lake is an upscale resort in the Wisconsin Dells, “The Waterpark Capital of the World”.  The dells offer indoor and outdoor waterparks, live entertainment, thrilling attractions, and awe inspiring natural beauty!
  2. Door County Bike Tours is an eco-friendly way to experience Door County, “the Cape Code of the Midwest” – a peninsula between Green Bay and Lake Michigan – where you can watch both a sunrise and a sunset over the water!  It offers cherry orchards, art galleries, wineries/breweries, five state parks, 19 charming communities, fish boils, and 11 historic lighthouses!
  3. The Apostle Islands National Lakeshore consists of 12 islands and coastline on Lake Superior, hosting a unique blend of culture and nature including sea caves, nine historic lighthouses and shipwrecks.  Discover each island’s story via tours, kayaking, and hiking.  They host endangered plant species, important nesting habitat, and one of the greatest concentrations of black bears!
  4. The Harley-Davidson Museum, in Milwaukee, isn’t your typical museum.  The interactive displays provide a unique experience, exhibiting more than 450 motorcycles and artifacts on a trip through time.  It was the first museum to gain the GREENGUARD Indoor Air Quality Certification and has an ongoing process for environmental improvements.
  5. The Stonefield Historic Site, located along the Great River Road in Wisconsin’s Driftless Area, includes a re-created 1900s rural village, the State Agricultural Museum, and the homesite of Wisconsin’s first governor, Nelson Dewey who has a nearby state park.

These are just a select few of Wisconsin’s eco-friendly destinations!  Explore the ‘Travel Green Wisconsin’ website and come take a look for yourself!

Submitted by Kristi Schultz, aka The Trippy Tripster, from Road Trippers R Us


7

 Germany

 

Rieselfelder Bird Sanctuary, Münster Rieselfelder Bird Sanctuary, Münster

Germany is the ideal destination for the eco-conscious traveler. A country full of history, culture, fabulous cuisine, and beautiful landscapes, it has so much to offer, but it is impossible to be an economic leader and be ecologically oriented, right?  Wrong!

The German government is making dramatic strides in environmental issues. Nuclear power is being phased out, and replaced by renewable energy forms. The Cogeneration Act requires manufacturing firms to utilize the “waste heat” created in their production processes. Rather than being demolished, old factories are often converted into cultural centers and tourist attractions, old wastewater facilities into bird sanctuaries, and military bases into wildlife habitats. Old buildings are also upgraded to meet new standards of efficiency, and re-forestation efforts have saved the Black Forest and cemented its status as one of the country’s greatest treasures.

But what is refreshing is that the German people embrace the environmental policies. Extensive recycling is legally required, but also widely practiced.  Each home and public venue has a number of separation categories for trash, so that little more than biological waste ends up in the landfills.  These separations were diligently applied in homes.  Nosier neighbors even make a point to check on the recycling practices of others on the block!

But more surprising is that the separations are made in public as well.  On the train, in the park, walking down the street, people visibly separate their disposable items into the correct categories, and take the time to put each in the proper bin.  Watching this gave me hope!

Submitted by Roxanna Keyes from Gypsy With A Day Job


8

 Guludo Beach Lodge, Mozambique

 

A starry night at Guludo Beach Lodge, Mozambique A starry night at Guludo Beach Lodge, Mozambique

Time for my contribution! There are so many wonderful places to choose from but this one deserves a special mention; Alex and I chose it as our wedding venue for good reason!

Guludo Beach Lodge in the Quirimbas National Park is an award winning ecotourism destination, with an ethos firmly rooted in social and environmental sustainability. The lodge was designed so that no trace would be left, and has been constructed using only local, natural materials. There is no running water or electricity, and yet it feels luxurious. Built and staffed by the local community, every decision was, and still is, made following consultation with the village residents. Located right on the beach, the setting is beautiful, the seafood is fresh and delicious, and there are numerous activities on offer to delight both adults and children. A percentage of your fee will go to the onsite charity, Nema Foundation, which has funded multiple wells, school meals and resources, ambulance vehicles, and construction projects. The staff are Guludo’s best asset and they will go out of their way to make your stay memorable. Certainly, we will never forget them or their bright smiles! Find out more about the highlights of this beautiful country here in my recommended two week itinerary, which will give you a taste for all that Mozambique has to offer. Thanks to Alex Miller for the photo, taken at our wedding.

 

A selection of three images from Iceland, Mozamabique and Tasmania, advertising a post on 8 destination for the eco-conscious traveller A selection of three images from Iceland, Mozamabique and Tasmania, advertising a post on 8 destination for the eco-conscious traveller
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Highlights of Mozambique in two weeks

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ften overshadowed by its neighbours to the north and south, Tanzania and South Africa, Mozambique is a hidden gem still relatively untouched by large-scale tourism.

It was partly for this reason that Alex and I chose to get married on Mozambique’s white-sand coastline in the north; it’s picturesque, private and an ocean-lover’s paradise. Over several trips, we took the opportunity to explore the length and breadth of the country’s diverse and beautiful landscape.

 

I have compiled a list of our favourite spots to see Mozambique’s wildlife, explore cities and bush, meet locals, relax and have some wonderful family (or child-free!) adventures. I recommend you drive as much as possible; we were able to see so much more, appreciate and understand the culture that much better, and come away with surprise experiences and stories that we otherwise wouldn’t have had.

This itinerary is very possible to do in two weeks so as to accommodate school holidays or work commitments and will give you a wonderful taste of all that Mozambique has to offer, leaving you desperate to return for more!


Maputo

Mozambique’s capital is a bustling city full of people, traffic and noise, but it is also one of Africa’s most attractive capitals. Set on the shores of the Indian Ocean, Mediterranean-style buildings house restaurants, cafes, bars and guesthouses on wide, tree-lined streets.  

The warnings you may hear of Maputo being unsafe are seemingly unfounded; everyone we met was friendly and we felt safe walking around at night. Of course, feelings of safety are anecdotal and depend entirely on personal experience, but I have no reservations about family travel here.

I highly recommend the craft market if you enjoy browsing beautiful artwork, sculpture and furniture. Be prepared to haggle but remember it’s a good rule of thumb to aim to pay what you think an item is worth, not the lowest possible.


Limpopo National Park

Parque Nacional Do Limpopo sits adjacent to Kruger National Park on the southern border with South Africa, and is a ‘big-five’ area.

I recommend staying at Machampane Wilderness Camp, located a five to six hour drive from Maputo. Set in the heart of the African bush, it’s an opportunity to enjoy being surrounded by nature.

The tented en suite rooms have basic facilities (running water but no electricity, and don’t be surprised if you share the room with ants and spiders) and rustic handmade furniture, including a comfortable bed for a good night’s rest. They’re certainly far more luxurious than any other tent I’ve slept in! The rooms overlook the Machampane river, which is home to hippos and a regular drinking source for other big game.

 

Our ranger was incredibly knowledgeable about both flora and fauna. During our dawn and dusk hikes through the bush, we were taught to identify clues while tracking game, which plants to avoid, and which plants would offer a lifeline if stuck out here unexpectedly.

After dinner, you can sit around a campfire with staff and other guests. The warming crackle of the fire, the blanket of stars overhead and the trickle of the running river, only briefly interrupted by the sound of elephants in the distance, all make for a relaxed evening affair after the excitement of the day’s adventures in the bush.


Gorongosa National Park

Located three hours from Beira airport, I urge you to make the journey to Gorongosa National Park for an incredible safari experience.

 

We had close encounters with lions and several huge herds of elephants, as well as many species of antelope. The resident warthogs, baboons and vervet monkeys are very curious and come right up to the secluded and tastefully furnished bedrooms.

The elephants of Gorongosa are survivors of the Mozambique civil war, a period that saw the numbers drop from over 2000 to approximately 500 elephants. The emotional scars remain, as is common with elephants recovering from severe poaching.

They are known to be anxious around humans and can charge if they feel threatened. Exposure to safe encounters with humans is reducing this anxiety but the guides are very knowledgeable about elephant behaviour so will keep you a safe distance and ensure you retreat if necessary.

The park itself is beautiful and offers a wide variety of landscapes and ecosystems. Where Limpopo is quite flat, Gorongosa has mountains, forests and vast open plains.

Take a trip to the Vinho community, which includes a boat ride and walk through the village. You will meet the locals and have an opportunity to learn more about their daily life, customs and traditions.

When we visited, we struck up a conversation (translated by our guide) with a gentleman and his ten children. He was busy rebuilding one of his two mud houses for one of his wives. His other wife lived directly opposite in the second mud house, just a few steps away, and he split his time between the two houses and his two families. A very alien concept to us, a British family, but not uncommon here.

One of the sons showed us round his mother’s house. Stooping to enter and with little space to move inside, the first word that came to mind was ‘claustrophobic’, particularly for a family of 8. He pointed out the living quarters and, at the side, the sleeping area. The floor was bare and there was nothing obvious to distinguish these zones.

A humbling experience and a pleasure to meet these children, who happily play with their siblings and are overjoyed to simply be able to attend school.


Vilankulos and the Bazaruto Archipelago

Vilankulos is the gateway to the Bazaruto Archipelago. Although many people pass through, Vilankulos is worth a visit in its own right and we found it to be less touristy than some of the other popular beach towns.

 

I can recommend the Baobab Beach Backpackers hostel, which is located a ten minute drive from the airport and provides cheerful accommodation right on the beach in a relaxed, fun setting and at a very reasonable price. The town centre with its shops, cafes and colourful markets is an easy walk or tuk-tuk ride away.

 

If you’re after idyllic but fairly extravagant luxury, Bazaruto and Benguerra Islands are the place to be. Relax and eat your meals sitting on the white sand beaches; explore the waters by kayak or on a sunset dhow cruise; ride horses across the island and take a walk up the towering sand dunes, meeting resident flamingos on the way.

The helicopter ride between Vilankulos airport and the archipelago offers fantastic views and is highly recommended, but be warned that it doubles the cost of a one night stay!


Nacala

Located 4 hours drive or a charter flight from Nampula airport, Nuarro Lodge in Nacala is wonderfully isolated and combines ecotourism with the everyday luxuries of running water, electricity and WiFi. Built with sustainable, locally-sourced materials by the local community, they have an ethos of both environmentally and socially responsible tourism.

Located on Nanatha bay, right on a coral reef, this is a beautiful location for watersports and relaxation. The lodge offers a ranging of diving packages but the snorkelling is also formidable. Bring waterproof shoes for children so they can walk on the rocks. We really enjoyed the company of the management team and staff from the local village.


Mozambique Island

Ilha de Moçambique has several colonial buildings and attractions of interest. The call to prayer can be heard across the island from the mosque; just one of a number of examples where the coming together of two distinct cultures can be observed in the island’s architecture. Take a walk around the island and stop at local markets and shops.


Pemba and the Quirimbas Archipelago

The Quirimbas National Park offers every ocean adventure you could wish for: scuba diving, snorkelling, whale watching, fishing, sailing on a traditional handmade dhow, and boat trips to neighbouring islands.

 

I highly recommend Guludo Beach Lodge, a sustainable establishment that has been built with the environment and local community in mind. There’s no electricity or running water, and yet they still achieve luxury. This is where Alex and I had our wedding.

Discover the ocean, play archery and volleyball on the beach, learn the crafts of pottery and palm leaf weaving, and search for wildlife from the lookout. A visit to Guludo village is an opportunity to experience rural life and shop for fabric (Guludo’s tailor is incredibly talented and is happy to make clothes, bags and many other items from your chosen fabric). You could even contribute to a community project run by Nema, Guludo’s partner charity.


Africa is my favourite continent (of the five I have been to) and I feel drawn to keep going back, particularly to sub-Saharan Africa. Africa is certainly where my heart is!

Of course, every country is different, with its own customs, culture and societal norms, but three things come to mind when I think of the African continent: the bold, bright colours of the landscape that are mirrored in clothes and artwork, and enable the collective African personality to shine; the music, led by the beat of a drum, that compels even the most rhythmically challenged to get up and dance; and the broad smiles of the people you’ll meet, so welcoming and proud that they are able to show you the country they love. Certainly, we experienced all this and more in Mozambique.

2-weeks-in-Mozambique 2-weeks-in-Mozambique