Eco friendly Christmas game, Pin the Nose on Rudolph, could be part of your green Christmas

A Green Christmas: Eco-Friendly Christmas ideas

Christmas is upon us already (how did that happen???); a time for family and friends, terrible music (that I secretly love), kindness to others (hopefully we do this year round but this time of year certainly brings out the Christmas cheer between strangers), and a whole lot of over-indulgence!

In order to minimise the already huge impact of the holiday season on the planet, I thought I’d share a few of my eco-friendly Christmas tips to help you and your loved ones make it a green Christmas this year.

 


Wrapping and gift tags

Many people are surprised to learn that most wrapping papers cannot be recycled. Those that are dyed, laminated, metallic and/or decorated in glitter, foil and plastics are headed straight for landfill (that’s most of them!).

Last year it was reported that the U.K. alone would throw away 108 million rolls of wrapping paper and 40 million rolls of sticky tape!

This year, you could try one of these alternatives to help keep all that waste out of landfill.

 

1

Reuse gift bags and paper that have been given to you. You can also hang on to any packaging paper you get sent through the year and if you still buy print newspapers, you can reuse these.

 

2

Furoshiki (aka fabric wrapping). This takes a little investment because obviously you need to have a supply of fabric, but it doesn’t have to be super expensive. I recommend spreading the cost out over the year (which is what I will be doing over 2019 having realised our December budget couldn’t stretch to enough fabric to wrap this year’s gifts!). Charity shop scarves and clothes work a treat, but if you want something more Christmassy, fabric and craft shops often stock organic cotton in a range of lovely, vibrant prints.

 

3

Use compostable or recyclable alternatives (ordinary brown paper is perfect for this) and add a festive touch. I’ve chosen to tie my brown paper packages with green and red raffia this year. You could also try adding pine cones, rosemary or fir as natural decorations. If you or the kids are feeling crafty, you might like to make a decoration that can then be used on the recipient’s tree (I’m no good at knitting or crochet, but I can make a mean salt dough!).

 

 

4

Make the wrapping part of the gift. Scarves, cotton to turn into beeswax wraps, tea towels, clothes or socks, muslins, sandwich bags…the possibilities are endless, and what fun having a present in a present!

 

When it comes to gift tags, you can incorporate this into your natural or homemade decoration. Write directly on to the salt dough or on to fallen leaves collected from the garden, or by stitching a name into your knitted decoration. You could also cut tags out of brown paper, or, if you get sent Christmas cards, before you throw them away at the end of the Christmas period, cut sections out of them to save for next year’s gift tags.

 

Instead of sticky tape, try using recyclable paper tape, string or raffia.

 

Cards

As a child, I remember my parents being sent enough cards to decorate the bannisters and hang as bunting all around the living room. Now, Alex and I get sent maybe three or four cards each year. It seems that with the rise of the internet and world-wide communication being easier (and cheaper) than ever, my generation will likely be the last to see this tradition, and thank goodness!

They’re costly, the emissions used to transport them all over the globe has an obvious environmental impact, I dread to think how many trees are destined to end up as cards each year, and most cards can’t even be recycled.

Instead…

1

Why not donate the money you would ordinarily spend on cards and stamps to your favourite charity?

 

 

2

Or spend the money on a Christmas box for your local homeless shelter?

 

 

3

Or on food to donate to a local food bank?

 

 

Of course, the tradition of catching up with friends and relatives, and letting people know that you’re thinking of them during the festive season, is a nice one and I don’t think it should be neglected.

Perhaps there are individuals on your Christmas card list that don’t use the internet so snail mail and a good old fashioned phone call is the only way to stay in touch. Perhaps you know that receiving a card will be of significant importance to some people. Whatever the reason, if you don’t feel able to forgo cards altogether, here are a couple of alternative suggestions for the select few you may still wish to send something to:

 

1

Send an e-card to those who use email. Yes, they’re pretty cheesy, but if the aim is to connect with people and let them know you’re thinking of them, job done! This is also a great option for people travelling who aren’t at a fixed address, and for kids (what child doesn’t love an animated card set to music?!).

 

2

Make your own cards that can be composted or at least recycled. This is what we do for the handful of people we know would appreciate a card in the post, particularly since we have spent the last two years away from our relatives and friends in the U.K..

 

Theo picks out a festive design from a quick online search, (while little, this has usually been hand/foot-print related, but as he gets older and his artistic skills expand beyond scribbles, he’ll have more creative freedom to do as he chooses for cards) and we use compostable paint and paper to recreate it. Remember that if you decorate with ordinary paint and crayons, glitter, stickers etc, it cannot be recycled or composted.

 

3

Send a traditional letter, nothing but pen and paper that can easily be recycled once it has been read.

 

 

Crackers

A beloved tradition for many, but, like party bags for birthdays, they are wasteful, full of plastic tat that gets swept straight into the bin, and the card used to make them can’t be recycled thanks to plastic laminate and plastic decorations such as glitter and bows. So, what are the alternatives?

I’ve made my own this year. They’re very simple to make, they’re (almost, with the exception of the centre of the snap) waste-free, and although they may not look as fancy as shop bought ones, they have everything you need for a good Christmas cracker: a bang, a joke, a hat and a present that won’t get chucked!

 

I made hats out of tissue paper, wrote out some suitably awful jokes on little pieces of paper, and bought everyone a small, personal gift that I knew they would use and appreciate. I put all that inside an empty toilet roll and threaded a cracker snap through. I then wrapped the whole lot in tissue paper, used a tiny piece of paper tape to secure the middle and tied the ends with raffia. Ta Dah! Homemade zero waste crackers!

You can also buy reusable crackers and low waste ones but I haven’t tried any of these so I can’t vouch for them.

 

Presents

Yes, it is lovely to both give and receive gifts, but it’s pointless if the gift isn’t well thought out for the person that’s receiving it. Don’t be the giver of a gift that sits unused at the back of the cupboard.

Instead of braving the overcrowded shopping malls in the run up to Christmas, why not instead try to think of zero waste gifts this year. You could:

 

1

Give an experience: days out, event tickets, restaurant vouchers, lessons in something the individual has been wanting to try.

 

 

2

Give a membership or subscription: perhaps a museum or gallery membership, membership to a sports centre or other hobby club, a subscription to an online or print magazine (if you go for print, try to select one that both ticks the right boxes for the individual so that it actually gets read, and has environmentally friendly production methods – look for those printed on recycled paper, with low carbon manufacturing, and that absolutely do not send their magazines out covered in plastic!).

 

3

Give something homemade: craft, bake, upcycle furniture. If you’re not that way inclined, perhaps you have other skills you could share as a gift? Painting and decorating? Hairdressing? Make-up and nails? Photography?

 

4

Give an online gift: an online course, a kindle book, an e-book.

 

 

5

If you want to buy something material, consider whether it can be bought second hand, and if not, purchase ethically. You might like to consider the following questions:

How has the item been manufactured? Has the manufacturing process upheld the highest standards of both environmental and social ethics? What materials have been used to make it? Are the materials sustainable and will they pollute the environment? Have animals or humans suffered at all so that you can purchase this item? Can you buy this item locally from an independent retailer?

 

The Christmas Meal

Food shopping:

Buy local, buy seasonal, buy sustainably farmed and only buy what you need.

Since moving to New Zealand, our Christmas meal has changed drastically! Sprouts aren’t in season, so we don’t have them. Chestnuts are imported and hard to find, so we don’t have them. Turkeys aren’t locally farmed, so we don’t have it. I use as much fresh produce from my garden as I can, and anything I don’t have, I buy from local farmers.

Unfortunately, Canterbury has had rubbish weather so far this summer (it feels more like a British Christmas!) and the unusual amount of rain has had an impact on fruit farmers. Cherries are typically eaten at Christmas here and we would ordinarily visit a local ‘pick your own’ farm to buy all our Christmas cherries and berries. Sadly they don’t have enough crop this year for ‘pick your own’ but we’re hoping to be able to do this in the new year if the weather improves.

 

Tableware:

First things first, please don’t use disposable tableware. If you don’t have enough for all your guests, ask someone to bring a few extra plates and cutlery, or find some bargains in a charity shop that can then be reused each Christmas and whenever else during the year that you have a large party.

Every year for as long as I can remember, my parents have hosted a large party in the Spring that coincides with a local sporting event (not that anyone cares much about that; it’s just a good excuse to get a lot of friends together!). My grandmother, when she was alive, would do the catering, and over a number of years built up quite a collection of charity shop plates. My family have all been very grateful for these plates over the years; they’ve been passed around and brought out at birthday celebrations, Christmases, Summer barbeques and a number of other events.

If you insist on disposable plates and cutlery, please opt for compostable ones as opposed to plastic. 100 million plastic utensils are used by Americans every day. Plastic cutlery is one of the largest ocean polluters and if you remain unconvinced, I guarantee you will feel differently once you’ve watched this horrendous video of a poor sea turtle having a plastic fork removed from its nose. I warn you, the video is distressing, but the turtle survives and it certainly hammers home the point.

 

Centerpieces and candles:

Go natural! Pine cones, branches, berries (cranberries are lovely and bright!), fir and other evergreens, and logs all make for lovely table decorations. Or even a simple house plant!

Normal paraffin candles are a petroleum by-product so instead seek out beeswax or soy wax alternatives.

 

Food waste:

The amount of food wasted each year at Christmas is quite staggering. In the U.K. alone, 54 million platefuls of food are thrown away at Christmas.

Cook only what you need and store any leftovers so that it will keep. Ask guests to bring a container so they can take some leftovers with them, and if you’re being hosted for Christmas, take a container with you (have you seen this post on zero waste for storage? The Klean Kanteen canisters are perfect for this!)

You can also reduce your food waste by keeping vegetable scraps and meat bones to make stock.

 

Tree Decorations

Obviously if you already own tinsel, plastic baubles and a wonderful, much-loved array of tacky decorations, please don’t just throw them away, but please don’t buy new ones either. You can keep reusing what you have (I’m pretty sure that my parents are still using many of the same decorations they had 25 years ago, and they have lots of life left in them yet!), or you can donate them to a charity shop/care home/shelter so that they can continue to be enjoyed by someone else.

When it is time to consider some new decorations, you could either make your own or buy handmade items that have been lovingly created using sustainable materials. We’ve done a mixture of the two.

Here are some ideas for your own homemade decorations. Theo’s had a great time in the run up to Christmas getting creative, practicing his fine motor skills and building his hand muscles.

1

Paper chains. Simple, effective and easily composted or recycled. They can be jazzed up with compostable crayons or paints.

 

 

 

2

Salt dough and natural paint. Kneading and rolling dough is a great activity for strengthening little hands. You can make lovely keepsakes using handprints or footprints to give as gifts, and with the leftovers you can sculpt, cut out and decorate whatever Christmassy creations you fancy. Provided you only decorate with natural paint, these can be composted at the end of their life.

 

3

Natural fibre felt. Felt can be bought in both natural and synthetic fibres so ensure you’re buying a natural fibre one. Stitch pieces together to create your masterpiece.

 

4

Nature’s treasures. Pine cones, cinnamon sticks, dried orange slices, and twigs crafted into snowflakes and stars all make for beautiful, rustic-looking decorations.

 

5

Bits and pieces from around the house that may otherwise be destined for landfill. This year we’ve used a stash of old buttons to make Christmas trees. You could use bottle tops, soda can rings, pieces of ribbon, jar lids; whatever you have lying around unused has the potential to be upcycled into a festive decoration.

 


I hope you find these eco-friendly Christmas ideas helpful. If you’re looking for some new year’s resolution ideas, check out this post on eco-friendly swaps for home and travel.

Wishing you and yours a very merry green Christmas! 

The perfect picnic location in Christchurch, New Zealand: the Port Hills overlooking Lyttelton Harbour. When we're packing for picnics, we like to use zero waste food storage, reusable straws and cups, and a sustainable lunch bag.

Zero waste food storage: Packing for picnics

When we’re travelling for extended periods, I tend to pack a picnic lunch for us most days (eating out every day gets expensive but we don’t want to have to come back to wherever we’re staying to prepare lunch, so taking food to have while out makes sense).

Likewise when we’re hiking or likely to be far from amenities for a good portion of the day, I always come prepared with plenty of food and drink (it’s one of my top tips for hiking with children; check out this post for my other suggestions).

So what do I store everything in to make sure it stays fresh, the right temperature, and doesn’t leak everywhere?

These are my zero waste food storage essentials. I would recommend them to anyone, not just families, looking to move towards a less wasteful, less plastic-filled lifestyle.

 


1

Snack bags

We use these every single day, not just when packing for picnics. Theo’s snack bags get filled with everything from rice/corn cakes, to nuts and seeds, fresh fruit and vegetables, and homemade sweet and savoury treats. These are a great zero waste food storage solution for any age (I use them for my snacks too!) that remove any need to use cling film or plastic sandwich bags.

We love Planet Wise; made to last (ours are still going strong with no wear and tear after more than 2 years of daily use), no leaks, the perfect size, and they come in a lovely range of patterns. I wash them at the end of the day in the kitchen sink, but they can also be put in the washing machine if you prefer.

 


2

Sandwich wraps

My go-to picnic lunch for us all are sandwiches; energy-boosting, tummy-filling, easy to prepare in travel accommodation, and can be packed full of goodness. Sandwich wraps are therefore a staple when it comes to packing for picnics.

A piece of cloth with an easy wipe-clean lining, they fold around your sandwich and seal with Velcro, keeping it fresh and secure. When unwrapped, they act as perfect plate.

We use two brands: Keep Leaf and Planet Wise. Keep Leaf are circular and more flexible, which equates to more forgiving when trying to pack thick sandwiches (or two on top of each other), whereas Planet Wise are square and less prone to staining; pick your priorities!

Both are great for zero waste food storage either at home for work lunches, or while travelling and out and about, it’s really a matter of personal preference.

 

The Planet Wise tint range has the added bonus of forgoing the cloth lining, meaning both sides can be wiped dry after cleaning. While not as pretty as the cloth patterns, this has proved very useful when camping or when we have limited time or ability to hang items to dry.

 


3

Insulated stainless steel bottle

If you don’t currently carry a reusable bottle, where have you been??? Stop buying disposable plastic bottles and invest in a good quality reusable one. My preference for material is stainless steel, and I particularly love Klean Kanteen’s vacuum insulated versions.

 

For me, it’s all about keeping my water cold, but they’re just as effective at keeping hot drinks hot if that’s what you’re after. Many coffee shops and smoothie bars even do discounts if you provide your own bottle or cup so it’s worth asking! When I’m packing for picnics, particularly if the excursion involves some strenuous exercise and the weather is warm, cold water is essential and I can rely on our insulated Klean Kanteen bottles to keep us refreshed and rehydrated all day.

 

 


4

Stainless steel canisters

Maybe sandwiches aren’t your thing and you’d rather have salad, soup or yesterday’s leftovers. As plastic Tupperware is prone to leaking and breakages (even the expensive stuff!), it’s far from ideal when packing for picnics and doesn’t make the cut for zero waste food storage! Stainless steel canisters are a great alternative and if you opt for the vacuum insulated ones, you can even enjoy a hot meal followed by still-frozen ice cream!

 

Like their bottles, Klean Kanteen’s range is reliably leak-proof, made to last, and consistent with marketing promises regarding the length of time food will remain hot or cold.

I am not suggesting you throw out all your plastic Tupperware to replace it with these (or glass alternatives to keep in the freezer). Keep using what you have until it’s not longer fit for purpose, but instead of buying more plastic ones when you do need to replace them, you might like to consider these instead.

 


5

Lunch bag

So, where do you put all your sandwiches, snacks and hot food once they’ve been prepared and stored?

You could of course just stuff it all in your day bag (and when we’re only taking out snack bags, this is exactly what i do) but when I’m packing for picnics, I prefer to store all the food together so I know where it is, nothing gets squashed at the bottom of my rucksack and I have somewhere to put all the empty wraps (and leftover crumbs that would otherwise be destined to spend eternity squished into the seams of my bag) once we’ve eaten.

Although the idea of them is romantic and incredibly quaint, let’s face it, picnic hampers aren’t all that practical! Unless you fancy lugging your woven wicker basket up mountains or even just to the office every day, you may want to invest in a lunch bag.

The size you opt for will depend on your meal preferences; for us, we have a small, box-shaped one with a zip lid that’s made from recycled plastic bottles. It’s big enough for about 5 sandwiches plus fruit and a snack for each of us. This works for us (for now…we’ll likely need something bigger as the boys get older!), but there are lots of ethical brands out there making lunch bags in all shapes and sizes and in a range of sustainable materials. Fresk and Fluf are two brands with great ethics that are worth checking out to see if any in their ranges would suit you.

 


6

Stainless steel straws

I always have some reusable straws in my bag, not just when I’m packing for picnics, so I’m always prepared to decline any plastic ones. We like stainless steel ones as they’re incredibly durable and easy to clean.

We have tried two brands: U-Konserve and Klean Kanteen. My slight preference is for the U-Konserve ones simply because they’re straight and only made from steel, but Theo likes the Klean Kanteen ones as they have a colourful silicone bendy tip which detaches from the metal straw.

 

If you don’t like metal in your mouth or you want to allocate a different colour to each member of the family, Klean Kanteen are the ones for you. I also imagine that the soft, curved tip would be better for some people with disabilities. Personally, I don’t like the silicone tips; they’re unnecessary dust magnets whether they live in my bag or in the kitchen draw.

Klean Kanteen straws come in a pack of four with a little brush for cleaning but I find it gets stuck very easily and is more hassle than it’s worth. The U-Konserve straws can be purchased in a two-pack or as a single with a brush (we don’t have a U-Konserve brush so I can’t comment on this).

 

 


7

Beeswax wraps

The final zero waste food storage essential on my list for packing for picnics are beeswax wraps. Eliminate the need for cling film by getting (or making) some of these wraps in a range of sizes.

There are a growing number of brands on the market and I’m sure they are tough to differentiate. We have tried Abeego and Honeywrap and love them both.

 

Our Abeego wraps have been heavily used for about 2 years and are still going strong. The Honeywraps, which we’ve only had for about a year, seem a bit more durable so I expect to last for even longer.

We use the extra large ones to keep bread fresh, the large for covering plates or wrapping sandwiches, and the medium and small are ideal sizes for chopped fruit and veg (perfect for corn on the cob, which is one of Theo’s favourites!) and covering bowls.

They’re a great addition to your kitchen cupboard and your travelling kitchen kit, but consider what you’ll use them for. They’re certainly not as long lasting as the sandwich wraps so if this is all you envisage using them for, your money is probably better spent on an extra couple of those.

If, however, you end up with a lot of chopped avocado halves, half eaten apples and pears (I believe this is symptomatic of a household with young children!) and you’re looking for a zero waste food storage solution for purchasing bakery items, beeswax wraps will be ideal for you!

An additional use for travellers is that they can be used to store soap or shampoo bars. The wax sticks to itself, keeping in even wet, sudsy soap!

Remember to wash with cool water only (otherwise the wax will melt) and with a mild soap or dish soap.

 


So, next time you’re packing for picnics, whether they be for a family hike or a mid-week office/school packed lunch, be sure to try out some of these zero waste food storage items to reduce your family’s footprint and make eating on the go a fun, mess- and waste-free affair.

Mother and son kayak together on Grand Lake, Colorado. The boy is wearing a Frugi sun hat.

Eco-Friendly Sun Protection

With the school summer holidays fast approaching in the Northern Hemisphere and sunny days with high UV exposure continuing year-round in the Southern Hemisphere, I thought it a good opportunity to write a short post on staying safe in the sun and choosing eco-friendly sun cream, hats and swimwear for the whole family.

 


Eco-Friendly Sun Cream…               Sunscreen…Suntan Lotion…Sunblock…

Since Theo was 3 months and experienced his first strong sun (he was born in the winter in the U.K. so he had to wait a few months!), we have been big fans of Green People’s Organic Children Sun Lotion SPF30.

Made from natural ingredients and containing ‘no nasties’, this eco-friendly sun cream has been gentle on his allergy-induced eczema-prone skin, and is safe for corals and marine life. He has never suffered with redness or burn so it seems to offer good protection (it’s advertised as offering high protection against UVA and UVB rays, with 97% UVB protection). Despite being thick, it isn’t greasy and it’s easier to apply and rub in than many of the other baby sun cream brands.

I recently came across this article, written in 2014, and contacted Green People for a response; I haven’t heard back! I believe they have changed any misleading advertising since this was printed. We’ve certainly not had any problems with it!

We really like the Organic Children Aloe Vera Lotion and After Sun as well.

 

Eco-Friendly Sun Hats

I have two requirements when choosing a sun hat for Theo: it must shade his face adequately and it must secure under his chin (because keeping a hat on a baby/toddler without a chin strap is a battle I can do without!). I have found two ethical brands that meet these specifications and have become firm favourites.

Frugi is a British children’s clothing company founded on the highest environmental and social standards. They use GOTS (Global Organic Textile Standard) certified organic cotton, as well as recycled plastic bottles and natural rubber for their rainwear. No chemicals, no hazardous pollutants, a fair wage and safe working environment for all their factory workers, and they work with factories to ensure water and energy consumption are kept to a minimum. They also donate 1% of their annual turnover to charity, including one children’s charity, one community charity and one environmental charity.

We have a lots of Frugi clothing and I love their Little Dexter hat with velcro tie, available in sizes newborn-4 years. We used last year’s Little Dexter hat every day during the summer so I immediately bought the next size up when they released this year’s collection (remembering that our seasons are opposite so I size up ready for later in the year)! The velcro’s really soft so didn’t bother or scratch Theo at all but I also found it to be very secure, even in Canterbury’s high winds!

We also use Frugi’s Little Swim Legionnaires hat at the beach. It has a large, soft brim and a great neck cover, and has a UPF 50+ rating, making it a great eco-friendly sun hat. While it doesn’t have a chin tie, it is elasticated for a good fit so it stays put!

If you’re looking for something with an even wider brim, Sunday Afternoons, an American family-run company, make a range of great eco-friendly sun hats with a focus on the highest sun protection. We really like the Clear Creek Boonie, which has an adjustable under-chin strap, UPF 50+ rating and a soft structured brim. What I really like about this company is that they donate to environmental and social causes that protect the landscape and support a love of the outdoors among the next generation.

 

Eco-friendly Sun and Swimwear

Theo’s last two swimming costumes have been Frugi. Even when subjected to regular sun, salt water and chlorine, I’ve been really impressed with how long they last. They offer good coverage and, like the hats, have a UPF 50+ rating. They zip at the back, come in lovely fun designs, and don’t have poppers on the inside legs. This obviously means harder nappy access but can be better once babies are mobile; I found that once Theo started crawling poppers always came undone anyway and were more hassle than they were worth. When he’s toilet trained, we may have to rethink as he wouldn’t be able to use the toilet without our help undressing.

When Theo was a newborn (he started swimming a minimum of weekly from 5 weeks) until about 6 months, he got cold in the water very quickly so I chose swimwear that offered a bit more warmth. Close Pop-In do a range with fleece lining: the baby cosy suit, and the toddler snug suit. Both have poppers at the crotch for easy nappy changes or toileting, the cosy suit opens fully at the front with Velcro and has a built in swimming nappy, and the snug suit has a zip at the back. Word of warning, these are sized quite small so size up if you’re unsure!

We have used both Pop-Ins and Tots Bots swimming nappies. In my opinion, Pop-Ins are better for babies, Tots Bots are better for toddlers. Pop-Ins are a tighter fit around the thighs so are harder to get on a wriggly toddler but offer a bit more of a barrier against those pre-weaning explosions!

For adult swimwear, there are lots of eco brands on the market but personally I find a lot of them quite drab looking. I like Jets, an Australian company whose products are all certified by Ethical Clothing Australia, ensuring that workers’ rights are protected throughout the supply chain. Sustainable manufacturing and the use of recycled materials in their fabric is central to the brand.

 


Enjoy the sunshine but remember to stay safe and look after our oceans! For some other suggestions on how to have an eco-friendly family holiday, check out this post on 20 ways to travel sustainably.

 

Eco-sun-protection Eco-sun-protection
A child's hand plays with a red wood toy Bajo aeroplane airplane

The Complete Guide to Flying with Kids

The thought of flying with kids is enough to keep many parents awake at night! Instead of feeling excited about your upcoming journey, are you worrying about how you’re going to keep your children happy, entertained, well slept, well fed, and clean for the duration of the flight, plus achieve all of this without annoying every other passenger on the plane?!

Don’t panic, it really will be ok. I can honestly say that every one of the 25 mostly long-haul flights Theo has been on to date has been a breeze, but we have learnt a few things along the way.

I recently had the pleasure of writing a guest post for my favourite ethical retailer, Babipur, detailing my 12 top tips to ensure your journey is as stress-free as possible.

 

View the post here for suggestions on:

  • Trip planning, booking the right flight and choosing the best seats.
  • Making the most of your checked luggage allowance and free baby items. If you are planning to take a car seat and buggy/stroller with you in the hold, I suggest protecting them. We use this padded car seat bag along with these Gate Check Pro bags (one for the car seat, which goes over the padded bag, and one for a buggy/stroller) and have found that they have all survived remarkably well for the price tag; well worth the investment!
  • Must-haves for your hand luggage.
  • Time management.
  • Getting through the chaos of airport and security. Hint: a sling helps massively!
  • Dealing with nappy changes in the airport and on flight. In this post, I go into more detail about using cloth nappies while travelling so you may also want to check that out.
  • Snacks and drinks, plus of course our favourite reusable bottles, bags and containers to carry them in. We wouldn’t be without our Klean Kanteens (a Kid Kanteen for Theo, an insulated one for water, which gets filled after we’ve gone through security, and a wide neck insulated one for coffee, which can be filled before departing and then refilled during your flight), Klean Kanteen canisters ( ideal if you need to take a meal on board; not too bulky, leak-proof and I recommend the insulated ones for any hot food), and our Planet Wise sandwich bags and wraps (check out the whole Planet Wise range as they have heaps of options in different sizes and prints to suit your style).
  • Helping little ones to equalise their ears.
  • Providing entertainment that lasts the whole flight. Click here for a few of our favourite (and very much tried and tested!) eco-friendly toys for travelling.

Flying with kids doesn’t have to be stressful! Have a safe flight and a wonderful trip making memories to cherish!

The link again to the whole post is here.

 

Flying-with-kids Flying-with-kids

 


This post contains affiliate links and will either take you the brand’s website or to the relevant amazon listing. I receive a small commission at no extra cost to you if you buy something using these links (but not if you leave the page and then go back to it later). This enables me to keep writing this blog and producing useful information, so please consider making any purchases through these links.

 

Lewis river between yellow and green grasses in the foreground and mountains in the background

Is New Zealand as eco-friendly as it seems?

What do you think of when you imagine New Zealand?

If you’ve never been, what’s the impression that photographs, films, and stories have left you with?

Lush countryside filled with grazing sheep? Dramatic landscapes of mountains and sparkling waters under a blue, cloudless sky? Extreme sports and outdoor adventure? Vineyards? The All Blacks performing the Haka?

I’ll bet that you might imagine that New Zealanders consider the environment a priority.

But is that the reality?


We’ve been in New Zealand for five months now and we’re loving it. We’re definitely feeling settled and although Christchurch might not be our home forever, we are very happy here for now and I suspect New Zealand will be our base from which we continue to explore for the foreseeable future.

The countryside is beautiful, the people are welcoming, and the lifestyle for families is fantastic. There are a few things that have surprised us though, particularly the lack of environmental awareness and practice.

The media does a wonderful job of marketing New Zealand as this super eco-friendly country that is leading the way in environmental policy. We had thought everyone would be very conscientious of the environment and protecting, not just New Zealand’s wildlife and landscapes, but the well-being of the whole planet.

Unfortunately, we have found that eco living isn’t high on people’s priority list. Of course there are individuals for whom this is important, but it certainly doesn’t seem to be part of the ingrained culture as we were expecting.

Here are 5 ways that we have been surprised by the lack of environmental awareness in New Zealand. Do these things surprise you too?


 

1

I was expecting to be able to buy fresh local produce at markets, butchers, fishmongers and greengrocers in every suburb of the big cities and in smaller towns. Don’t get me wrong, Christchurch has all of these, but only a handful and they are dispersed right across the city (for great quality fresh produce head to Riccarton House and Bush for the farmers’ market on Saturdays, Tram Road Fruit Farm for delicious ‘pick your own’ fruits, Vegeland on Marshland Road, Cashmere Cuisine butcher on Colombo Street, and Theo’s Fisheries on Riccarton Road. You can read more about visiting Christchurch here).

Most people shop at the supermarket since fresh produce is not easily accessible for all, particularly without a car. Sadly there isn’t anything near us so we have to either rent a car or get the bus into town, lugging heavy bags and a toddler (we don’t have a car – see point 4!). In smaller towns buying fresh produce is near impossible without a considerable drive.

 

2

At supermarkets, checkout staff usually pack bags (unless, like me you bring your own bags, but I am yet to witness anyone else do this). They have obviously been trained to under-pack the bags to avoid any potential complaints, and to double-bag each meat item separately. A shop that really should fit in one bag all of a sudden requires five! Reducing plastic bag use was just one of my suggestions for new year’s resolutions; check out other tips here.

 

3

Irrigation is a huge problem in the drier regions of New Zealand. We see this a lot in Canterbury, where the average annual rainfall is 600-700mm compared to the West Coast’s 2000-3000mm on the other side of the Southern Alps.

During the hot, dry summer, everyone’s gardens remain sparkling green and cows graze on the lush dairy farms that fill the Canterbury Plains. There’s more land here so despite cattle being more suited to the temperate rainforest climate of the West Coast, farmers continue to irrigate the Plains.

We have been informed that sadly, due to this irrigation and the increase in dairy farming, swimming holes and rivers are becoming unsafe for humans, let alone other wildlife, and the Avon river that winds through Christchurch, though it may look clear and inviting, is actually incredibly polluted.

 

4

Cars are horrible, smelly, polluting old things! The car market is nuts! They’re stupidly expensive as everything has to be shipped here, so old cars hold their value really well, unlike in the U.K. They also last longer since roads aren’t gritted during the Winter, so people end up driving cars that you won’t have seen on the road for at least a decade in the U.K.

 

5

Supermarket meat is fairly shocking. Chicken breasts are twice the size they should be, it is surprisingly difficult to get uncooked ham (even in the run up to Christmas, despite ham being the meat dish of choice), deli meat is horribly watery and no longer tastes like meat, and there is no variety. Your options are chicken, pork, lamb, beef and a limited range of fish. Essentially, although there are regulations around the use of hormones, meat is pumped full of water, and getting your hands on unprocessed meat is tough.

We’d reduced our meat consumption in order to lessen our footprint prior to arriving in New Zealand, but as meat-eaters this was still a disappointing shock to us. Currently, about 80% of our meals are vegan but if ever there was a time to go totally vegan, it’s now!

 


Despite these surprises, there are of course a number of things that New Zealand gets absolutely spot on!

The Resource Management Act ensures that Iwi are consulted about natural resource matters. This consultation with Maori tribes provides an extra layer of environmental protection, as well as ensuring that areas of cultural significance are preserved. More people working to protect land can surely only be a good thing.

We love that people eat seasonally and there is significantly less reliance on imports compared to in the U.K.. Before we moved, we were a little concerned that we’d miss having year-round access to seasonal fruit and vegetables, as well as produce not locally grown at all. In fact, we are enjoying knowing that all the produce we buy in store has been sourced locally, and I now also grow most of our vegetables myself (along with raspberries and blackberries, as these are expensive to buy).

The healthy populations of birds, bees and butterflies are noticeable, even in the big cities. When we’ve been camping, it has been a pleasure to wake to the loudest dawn chorus I have ever witnessed – so loud that in Hanmer Forest, it took me a while to work out whether the white-noise hum that had roused me was the sound of a storm echoing in the branches above, or the simultaneous song of hundreds of birds!

Environmental awareness may not be part of the ingrained culture, but an outdoor lifestyle is certainly typical for New Zealanders. Even in the cities, there are fantastic opportunities to enjoy the outdoors and people certainly make the most of it. We live a few minutes from forest mountain biking, 10 minutes walk from the beach and great surfing spots, 30 minutes drive to beautiful hiking and I can’t wait for winter as we’re only an hour from the ski fields!


So what do you think? Are you surprised? Is this different to the picture you had of New Zealand?

Happy-new-year-2018-firework

20 tips for sustainable travel

With 2018 just around the corner, are you looking for some worthwhile new year’s resolutions?

Do you want to be mindful of the environment when you travel and make choices that will reduce your footprint? Perhaps this feels overwhelming or you’re unsure where to start? Perhaps, like Scott from The Line Trek, you are sceptical about eco lodging and wonder whether it’s worth the extra cost, but still want to do your bit? (You can find some great suggestions for eco destinations that are definitely worth it here!)

I asked a few fellow travel bloggers for their sustainable travel tips and together we came up with this fantastic list, ideal for some new year’s resolutions as we head into 2018!

Being green doesn’t have to be expensive or time consuming; many of these ideas are free or of minimal cost, and won’t take any time at all, leaving you to enjoy your travels with a clear conscience.

We can all chip in by making small changes in our every day lives. Sustainable travel is something we can all aspire to!


1

First up, Scott suggests practising ‘random acts of earth kindness‘:

“While hiking in El Chalten, Argentina (Patagonia) recently, I witnessed a man carrying a plastic bag and picking up random small trash as he was hiking. ‘What a brilliant (AND FREE) idea’, I thought. (Though I must admit that my husband has been throwing away random trash at beaches for quite a few years now). Next time you’re walking down the street and you see that candy wrapper lying on the ground, don’t just shake your head… pick it up!!”

What a great idea! Theo, at age 2, is already a determined litter-picker. He knows that we never leave rubbish behind and that it needs to be sorted into the correct bin, so you can see that it bothers him when he finds rubbish on the street, at the beach or in the playground, and he’ll happily carry it with him until he can dispose of it properly. We teach him about the importance of looking after our planet and it’s great to see him developing good habits already.

 

Emma from Small Footprints, Big Adventures also collects rubbish from the beach with her family. She comments that it’s sad how much they find, but it’s a great lesson for her two children . If you have kids that enjoy a bit of fun family competition, why not turn it into a game to see who can collect the most?


2

Continuing the bag theme, Scott suggests ‘BYOB‘:

“No, not ‘bring your own beer’, you lush! Bring your own bag.” A cloth shopping bag takes very little space in your suitcase or backpack, and can easily be carried with you daily. You’ll have a convenient tote for groceries and will cut down on single use plastic bags that are littering cities across the globe, sitting in landfill for centuries and destroying ocean wildlife.

Emma points out that having cloth bags handy is useful, not only for shopping, but also for storing and transporting laundry.

Like these guys, I keep a spare cloth tote in my handbag at all times so I’m never caught out.

I also recommend taking reusable fresh produce bags to both supermarkets and farmers’ markets (I like these from The Rubbish Whisperer) so you never have to use plastic bags. They’re small, lightweight and easy to stuff in a bag for the day just in case you stumble across a market on your travels.

3

Use reusable water bottles and coffee cups:

Use a stainless steel water bottle and refill it rather than buying bottled water. I love our Klean Kanteens, particularly the insulated ones that keep water cold throughout the day (we have a 20oz in ‘Bamboo Leaf’ green and a 32oz in ‘Winter Lake’ blue, both of which are great for hiking and other sports). They have a range for the whole family with a variety of size and lid options. Theo has his non-insulated Kid Kanteen bottles in place of a traditional sippy cup, his insulated one has been ideal for taking out on hot days, and we also get a lot of use out of the 10oz cups (they’re great if you’re at all worried about breakages on hard floors in an airbnb, in restaurants and on patios).

 

If you’re travelling somewhere with no access to clean tap water, rather than buying single-use plastic bottles, take the time to either boil your water first, or treat it with water purification tablets.

If you absolutely must buy bottled water, consider getting one large bottle to share rather than an individual one for each member of the family.

 

Take away coffee cups can’t be recycled as they have a plastic layer on them, which can’t be separated during the recycling process. Klean Kanteen to the rescue again!

The insulated ones are just as good at keeping drinks hot as they are at keeping them cold. They don’t leak and they will keep your drink at the right temperature ALL day. Coffee shops tend to also give discounts if you supply your own cup, so this is a double win!

If you’re a coffee shop addict or are planning a trip somewhere cold and would like to have a warm drink to sip on while you’re out and about, consider using one of these 16oz wide lid ones (we have it in ‘Roasted Pepper’ red). It’s also great for smoothies and storing ice lollies for the kids…and the big kids!


4

Continuing the beverage theme, say “no” to straws:

 

Unless you have a medical need for them, straws are totally unnecessary. But, for some reason, on occasion we like sipping our drinks through a tube, and I’ve never met a child who doesn’t enjoy using a straw. So, I always have a couple of stainless steel straws in my handbag. We love our U-Konserve straws.

I’m always ready to refuse a plastic straw but have learnt that you need to speak up quickly (particularly in countries where it is customary to give iced water to customers as soon as they walk in the door, which I love but I wish they’d ditch the straw!), and that sometimes you will be left feeling frustrated when you’re given one anyway or they remember for the adults but bring water for kids in a disposable cup with a disposable lid and straw (why?!?).

According to National Geographic, Americans alone use 500 million straws daily. While these small, lightweight bits of plastic seem fairly innocuous, they are having a catastrophic effect of marine wildlife.

You just have to look at our beaches to know that straws don’t get recycled and many will end up in the ocean. Fish, shellfish, mammals and sea birds consume them (meaning they also end up in our food chain, which you can read more about here), and sea life gets entailed in them (you may remember this horrible video of scientists removing a straw from a sea turtle’s nose after it went viral in 2015 – please note that this footage is distressing).

 

So, say “no” to straws.

‘What do you store dirty ones in?’ you ask? Try one of these reusable wet bag pouches from Planet Wise.


5

Use reusable food bags and wraps:

Ditch the cling film and plastic ziplock bags completely!

We use our Planet Wise sandwich bags every single day. The leak-proof design and waterproof lining makes them ideal for both wet and dry snacks (fruit, both fresh and dried, nuts, seeds and rice cakes are favourites here), and we cut down on packaging waste by buying in bulk and then only taking out what we need for the day. The zipper means Theo can easily help himself whenever he’s hungry, and they can be machine or hand washed.

 

On the left of the photo are three from the tint range, which are slightly opaque (as they don’t have the fabric outer layer like the ones on the right) so you can see what’s inside, and are top rack dishwasher safe (although I haven’t been brave enough to try this!). Personally, I prefer the look and feel of the fabric range, as they come in a huge variety of fun designs. I find the tint range more industrial and stiff, but both serve the same purpose equally well so this is entirely down to individual preference.

Emma uses her reusable snack pouches to store bits of rubbish while the family are out and about without access to a bin. What a clever idea! You could also use them to store small toys or art supplies while travelling. The bright colours would make it easy to quickly locate the item that will keep your little one entertained before all hell breaks loose (if you need eco toy recommendations for stress-free journeys, check out this post)!

 

If you’re packing a picnic lunch to take out with you, sandwich wraps are brilliant! No more soggy, cling film wrapped sandwiches! We have both Keep Leaf and Planet Wise wraps, both of which fold around your sandwich and secure with velcro. They open up into a convenient plate so there’s no need for a disposable one. The two brands are different shapes but a similar size, both fitting one sandwich comfortably and two stacked on top of each other at a squish.

I find that Keep Leaf is more susceptible to stains (the inside layer isn’t as robust as the Planet Wise ones) but they are more flexible (so better for folding around fresh bread rather than packaged, uniformly-sliced bread) and the stitching around the edge is more ‘finished’. Like the sandwich bags, Planet Wise do both a fabric and tint range.
Beeswax food wraps are ideal for use at home (I use mine to put over leftovers in the fridge and wrap around bread or cut fruit to keep it fresh) and for out and about (I always use them to wrap cooked corn on the cob and crudités). I have used both Abeego and Honeywrap while travelling and would recommend them both. They take up no space at all in your luggage and will significantly reduce your waste.